Welcome

Canadian Studies at Glendon College is the in-depth study of the Canadian experience and the place of the country in the world. It provides students with the opportunity to study national issues in both official languages and from a variety of disciplines, including History, Geography, Law, Political Science and Sociology. With courses in ‘Language, Culture and Literature,’ ‘Structures of Society’ and ‘Economy and the Environment,’ you will develop a multi-dimensional understanding of Canada’s political and legal systems, socio-cultural and linguistic landscapes as well as its geographical, ecological and historical realities, including in its relationship to Indigenous Peoples.

EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION 

Slide 1While in the program, you will be invited to participate in the activities of the Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies, which serves as York’s research engine for the study of Canada and of Canada in the world.

The Robarts Centre offers you the opportunity to become a Robarts Centre Fellow to support knowledge and skill development, networking and community building, volunteering, peer and mentorship opportunities, beyond the classroom.

.

PROFESSORS

During the 4th anniversary of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s decision to open Germany’s borders to refugees, Professor Michael Barutciski participated in a debate on the political consequences of this humanitarian gesture and its significance for countries such as Canada.

Professor Jean Michel Montsion received a national grant to study the racialization of Asian international students to Canadian universities. From 2019 to 2023, he will lead a team of nine researchers for this project, which aims at better understanding the ethnic, migratory, historical, geographic and urban dimensions of racialization.

.

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

Canadian Studies is available as a bilingual or trilingual international Bachelor of Arts.

Ours is one of the only Canadian Studies programs in the country to offer courses taught in English and in French.

Get a degree with tremendous breadth and flexibility thanks to courses drawn from several academic areas — history, political science, sociology, economics, women’s studies, and more.

.

IN THE NEWS

Professeur des Études canadiens Colin CoatesProfessor Colin Coates adds two collections to the growing literature on environmental history

Within the space of five months, Professor Coates published two works on this burgeoning field in Canada. Read more »

 

glendon-citizenshipBilingual citizenship ceremony at Glendon unique lesson for students

Students taking a course on Canadian citizenship at York University’s Glendon College were given a unique experiential education opportunity on Nov. 3… Read more »

Ready to apply?

Ontario Universities’ Application Centre (OUAC) Codes
BA: YYS
iBA Bilingual: YGG
iBA Trilingual: YGH (Upper-year entry)

Here, you will find more detailed information on the core courses and the course structure for Canadian Studies. Please note that if you choose a specific path or not, the requirements are the same but there is flexibility in the course selection. Please contact the program with any questions.

The Introductory Course is open to incoming first- and second-year students and other students by permission. It provides an overview of Canadian geography, politics, history, society and culture. Courses with a course number in the 2000’s are normally open to first-, second-, and third-year students. These courses are one-term, and they build on the approaches of the first-year course. The second-year courses have no prerequisite. The program offers the core first- and second-year courses in both languages each year.

Specialized Courses (such as the core course CDNS 3621) are normally open to second-, third-, and fourth-year students. The core third-year course is offered annually. It is a bilingual course, taught in both English and French. Students may choose the language in which they write and contribute to course discussions. The core course is cross-listed with International Studies, and it has no prerequisite.

The Senior Seminar (CDNS 4621) is a multidisciplinary course open to students in their third or fourth year. This bilingual course, “Decolonizing Canada”, focuses on issues related to reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada.  Students must have either six credits in any Canada-themed course as a prerequisite or departmental permission. The course is open to students in other programs and is cross-listed to the degrees in History and Sociology.

All of the core courses in Canadian Studies fulfill General Education requirements in Humanities or Social Science.

Majors in Canadian Studies must also take at least six credits in each of three broad areas:  “language, literature and culture,” “the structures of society,” and “the economy and the environment.” These courses are offered by different departments, and students should plan ahead as the choice of courses within these categories varies a great deal from year to year. Some courses in specific disciplines may have their own prerequisites.

In all courses, written assignments and examinations may be submitted in either official language.

The curriculum in Canadian Studies offers a broad, multidisciplinary approach to the study of the country. Students acquire a range of disciplinary skills that are of great value in the workplace.

CANADIAN STUDIES OFFERS THE FOLLOWING DEGREE TYPES AND CERTIFICATES:

  •  Specialized Honours BA/iBA
  •  Honours BA/iBA
  •  Honours Double Major BA/iBA
  •  Honours Major/Minor BA/iBA
  •  Bachelor of Arts

STUDENTS MUST FOLLOW THE UNDERGRADUATE CALENDAR REQUIREMENTS FOR THE YEAR THEY ENTERED OR SWITCHED INTO THEIR PROGRAM.

Access detailed program requirements below:

Canadian Studies BA and iBA Degree requirements 2020-2021
Canadian Studies BA and iBA Degree requirements 2019-2020
Canadian Studies BA and iBA Degree requirements 2018-2019
Canadian Studies BA and iBA Degree requirements 2017-2018
Canadian Studies BA and iBA Degree requirements 2016-2017
Canadian Studies BA and iBA Degree requirements 2015-2016
Canadian Studies BA and iBA Degree requirements 2014-2015
Canadian Studies BA and iBA Degree requirements 2013-2014

Canadian Studies BA and iBA Degree requirements 2012-2013
Canadian Studies BA and iBA Degree requirements 2011-2012
Canadian Studies BA and iBA Degree requirements 2010-2011

Courses

Fall/Winter 2020-2021

Courses recognized by Canadian Studies offered by other programs

Full list of all courses offered at Glendon for the Fall/Winter 2020-2021.

Students can choose Canadian Studies for various reasons, including to meet the requirements for a Bachelor of Education. Here, we offer three paths for students to think more concretely of what a Canadian Studies degree at Glendon looks like, and in each path, you will find a suggested roadmap in terms of suggested courses to meet the degree requirements and develop specific skills associated with it. Please contact the program if you have any questions.

For those interested in Canadian Studies as part of their Bachelor of Education, please note that although Canadian Studies itself is not a recognized teachable in Ontario, Canadian Studies majors and minors have been able to use their credits towards teachable subject areas such as First Nations, Métis and Inuit Studies, Social Sciences-General and History. More details can be found at the following link under Faculty-Wide Degree Requirements and BED Concurrent and Consecutive Program Models.

Human Rights & Social Justice

In this path, you will learn how in Canada we have engaged and are engaging with questions pertaining to human rights and social justice. By looking at how such issues are dealt with in Canada and internationally, you will develop an understanding of what we can do to advance social justice causes and uphold human rights as well as some of the limitations on the ways in which this is done. The course selection emphasizes notably questions of civil liberties, gender relations, immigration, ethnocultural diversity, labour and the environment.

Objectives

  • To describe and discuss the state of affairs, recent evolutions and limitations of human rights and social justice in Canada, while comparing it to other countries, and assessing the influence of global processes on Canadian society
  • To gather, combine and assess information from a variety of sources and disciplines in order to defend a specific human rights or social justice cause in Canada, while integrating perspectives from other societies and countries
  • To communicate clearly, argue accurately and defend your well-researched perspective on a specific topic in human rights and social justice in Canada, in both official languages and in both oral and written forms
  • To take position about the current state of affairs and the state of knowledge about human rights and social justice in the Canadian context, while seeking to complete it with international perspectives and interdisciplinary sources
  • To adopt an ethical behaviour in research consistent with social and academic responsibility that transfers to non-academic and community settings

Suggested Courses by Year and Degree Requirements

Year 1 (30 credits for 120-credit degree)

Major and Gen Ed (18 credits)

  • CDNS1920 6.0 Understanding CDNS
  • NATS1605 6.0 Communication, Health and Environment
  • POLS2600 6.0 Intro to Canadian politics Or LIN2636 3.0 and 2636 3.0 Anishinaabemowin Or ECON1680 6.0 Modern Economic History: A Canadian Perspective

Bilingual (FSL 1000 – 6 credits)

Upper level electives (not now)

Electives (6 credits)

  • ILST2622 3.0 Culture, Globalisation and International Civil Society
    • and SOCI2652 3.0 Social Movements and Contentious Politics in a Global Context
  • Or POLS2510 6.0 Introduction to Comparative Politics

Year 2 (30 credits for 120-credit degree)

Major credits (12 with 6 at 3000 level)

  • CDNS2602 3.0 Citizenship and Immigration
  • CDNS2618 3.0 Visual Arts
  • CDNS3617 6.0 Multiculturalisme et ethnicité Or POLS 3135 3.0 Public Law 1 and 3136 3.0 Public Law 2

Gen Ed (completed)

Bilingual (6 credits)

Upper level electives (not now)

Electives (12 credits)

  • ILST3650 3.0 Paix, Sécurité et droits humains internationaux
  • ILST3652 3.0 Introduction to International Law
  • GWST1502 6.0 Introduction aux Études des femmes et de genre Or SXST 1601 6.0 Introduction aux Études de la sexualité Or SOCI2501 6.0 Principles of Sociology Or FRAN2335 6.0 Initiation à la méthodologie littéraire Or CDNS1900 3.0 Reconciling Literature: Understanding Texts and Context and SOCI2527 3.0 Sociology of Work and Gender

    Year 3 (30 credits for 120-credit degree)

    Major (12 credits, 6 at 3000 and 6 at 4000)

    • CDNS3621 3.0 Canada in Global Perspective
    • CDNS3663 3.0 Human Rights and Civil Liberties in Canada
    • SOCI4601 3.0 Indigenous Activism
      • And CDNS3100 Individual Studies (individual project or G21) Or GWST4512 6.0 Gender and the Law in International Perspective

    Gen Ed (completed)

    Bilingual (FSL 1000 – 6 credits)

    Upper level electives (6 credits at 3000)

    • GWST3511 3.0 Sexualité, femmes et pouvoir
    • HUMA3644 3.0 Asylum

    Electives (6 credits)

    • GWST3507 6.0 Femmes et santé

    Or ILST3250 3.0 Économie internationale et développement

    • And POLS3694 3.0 Cities, Migrants and the Politics of Belonging
    • Or CDNS 4410 3.0 Society, Social Justice and the Archives

    Year 4 (30 credits for 120-credit degree)

    Major (6 credits at 4000)

    • CDNS4621 6.0 Decolonizing Canada Or CDNS4100 6.0 Individual Studies (group project or G21)

    Gen Ed (completed)

    Bilingual (FSL 1000 – 6 credits)

    Upper level electives (6 credits at 4000)

    • ILST4601 3.0 Issues in International Law
      • And ILST4651 3.0 International Refugee Protection Or SOCI4604 3.0 Gender, Politics and Culture

    Electives (12 credits)

    • SOCI4667 6.0 International Migrations: Contemporary Issues and Debates
    • SOCI4620 3.0 Urban Environmentalism and Urban Sociology And SOCI4642 3.0 International Perspectives on Race and Racism Or CDNS3450 3.0 Oral History Workshop

    Community & Civic Engagement in Toronto

    This path is for students interested in community work and civic engagement. Starting from the reality of living in Toronto and in Ontario, you will learn how to contribute, engage and organize in public life here in your community. Looking at local issues and how they fit in broader national and international trends and realities, you will find out the potential for civic engagement here and elsewhere and the ways in which community organizing works in Toronto and in Ontario. From artistic forms of engagement to the inner workings of political institutions, strategies of various communities in advocating for their rights, you will learn how you can best make a difference for a cause in which you believe, while understanding well the challenges and limitations to such actions.

    Objectives

    • To identify, describe and discuss various forms of civic and community engagement in Toronto and in Ontario, while using international examples to compare and critically assess their contribution
    • To use and combine information from a variety of sources and disciplines to understand how specific community actions have made a difference in Canada, while evaluating their linkages, similarities and differences with civic actions from other societies
    • To communicate clearly, argue accurately and defend your well-researched perspective on a specific topic relating to civic engagement and community organizing in Canada, in both official languages and in both oral and written forms
    • To assess critically the current state of affairs and the state of knowledge about community and civic engagement in the Canadian context, while seeking to complete it with international perspectives and interdisciplinary sources
    • To plan and carry out ethical research strategies consistent with social and academic responsibility to support various public causes from non-academic and community settings

    Suggested Courses by Year and Degree Requirements

    Year 1 (30 credits for 120-credit degree)

    Major and Gen Ed (18 credits)

    • CDNS1920 6.0 Understanding CDNS
    • NATS1200 6.0 La vie sauvage à Toronto
    • CDNS2617 3.0 La Géographie au Canada
      • And CDNS2630 3.0 Peuples autochtones au Canada Or LIN2636 3.0 Anishinaabemowin 2 and LIN 2628 3.0 Anishinaabemowin 2

    Bilingual (FSL 1000 – 6 credits)

    Upper level electives (not now)

    Electives (6 credits)

    • SOCI2510 6.0 Principles of Sociology

    Year 2 (30 credits for 120-credit degree)

    Major credits (12 with 6 at 3000 level)

    • CDNS2602 3.0 Citizenship and Immigration
    • CDNS2618 3.0 Visual Arts
    • HIST3210 6.0 Ontario 1784-1970 Or CDNS3617 6.0 Multiculturalisme et ethnicité Or POLS3560 3.0 Ontario Government and Politics And HIST3242 3.0 Mémoire et histoire publique

    Gen Ed (completed)

    Bilingual (6 credits)

    Upper level electives (not now)

    Electives (12 credits)

    • GWST3511 3.0 Femmes, sexualité et pouvoir
    • SOCI2652 3.0 Social Movements and Contentious Politics in a Global Context Or ILST2622 3.0 Culture, Globalization and the International Civil Society
    • GWST3514 6.0 Genre et immigration au Canada Or GWST1502 6.0 Introduction aux Études des femmes et de genre Or SXST 1601 6.0 Introduction aux Études de la sexualité Or FRAN2335 6.0 Initiation à la méthodologie littéraire Or POLS2600 6.0 Introduction to Canadian Politics Or CDNS1900 3.0 Reconciling Literature: Understanding Texts and Contexts And SOCI2527 3.0 Sociology of Work and Gender

      Year 3 (30 credits for 120-credit degree)

      Major (12 credits, 6 at 3000 and 6 at 4000)

      • CDNS3621 3.0 Canada in Global Perspective
      • CDNS3663 3.0 Human Rights and Civil Liberties in Canada
      • SOCI4601 3.0 Indigenous Activism Or CDNS4643 3.0 Writing Toronto
      • And CDNS3100 3.0 Individual Studies (individual project or G21) Or CDNS3450 3.0 Oral History Workshop

      Gen Ed (completed)

      Bilingual (FSL 1000 – 6 credits)

      Upper level electives (6 credits at 3000)

      • POLS3694 3.0 Cities, Migrants and Belonging
      • HUMA3644 3.0 Asylum

      Electives (6 credits)

      • SOCI4604 3.0 Gender, Politics and Culture
      • SOCI4620 3.0 Urban Environmentalism and Urban Sociology
      • Or HIST 3450 3.0 Oral History Workshop

      Year 4 (30 credits for 120-credit degree)

      Major (6 credits at 4000)

      • CDNS4621 6.0 Decolonizing Canada Or CDNS4100 6.0 Individual Studies (group project or G21)

      Gen Ed (completed)

      Bilingual (FSL 1000 – 6 credits)

      Upper level electives (6 credits at 4000)

      • HIST4310 6.0 Histoire vivante: Créer l’histoire publique du Grand Toronto

      Electives (12 credits)

      • SOCI4667 6.0 International Migrations: Contemporary Issues and Debates
      • GWST3514 6.0 Genre and Immigration au Canada Or HIST4220 6.0 Canadian Labour and Immigration History Or HIST4618 3.0 Canadian Environmental History And SOCI4642 3.0 International Perspectives on Race and Racism Or HIST4200 3.0 Work Placement: Community Engaged Public History Project Or CDNS4410 3.0 Society, Human Rights and the Archives

      Migration, Multiculturalism & Settlement

      In this path, we bring together questions of migration and settlement together for students interested in the ways in which Canadian society is shaped by and is shaping migration patterns. We also put an emphasis on immigration to Canada, questions of social integration and the management of local ethnocultural diversity. You will learn how these three processes have evolved together in the Canadian context, and how they link Canadian society to various places in the world. You will develop an understanding of key issues affecting Canada’s role in migratory and ethnocultural landscapes, including questions of race and racism, social issues affecting newcomers to Canada, and the ways in which Canada’s multicultural and immigration frameworks fit into global trends and realities.

      Objectives

      • To describe and discuss the various dimensions of migration and settlement to Canada, including the management of cultural diversity, while assessing their relationships to international dynamics and comparing the Canadian situation to other contexts
      • To identify and combine information from a variety of sources and disciplines in order to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of Canada’s design and implementation of immigration, multiculturalism and settlement policies, while integrating perspectives from other societies
      • To communicate clearly, argue accurately and defend your well-researched perspective on a specific topic relating to migration, multiculturalism and settlement in Canada, in both official languages and in both oral and written forms
      • To take position in the current state of affairs and the state of knowledge about migration patterns, the management of cultural diversity and social integration in the Canadian context, while seeking to complete it with international perspectives and interdisciplinary sources
      • To adopt an ethical behaviour in research consistent with social and academic responsibility that transfers to non-academic and community settings, and especially in support of marginalized groups such as newcomers, asylum-seekers and racialized minorities among others

      Suggested Courses by Year and Degree Requirements

      Year 1 (30 credits for 120-credit degree)

      Major and Gen Ed (18 credits)

      • CDNS1920 6.0 Understanding CDNS
      • NATS1605 6.0 Communication, Health and Environment
      • HIST2670 6.0 Histoire du Canada Or ECON1680 6.0 Modern Economic History: A Canadian Perspective

      Bilingual (FSL 1000 – 6 credits)

      Upper level electives (not now)

      Electives (6 credits)

      • ILST2622 3.0 Culture, Globalisation and International Civil Society
        • and SOCI2652 3.0 Social Movements and Contentious Politics in a Global Context
      • Or SOCI2510 6.0 Principles of Sociology

      Year 2 (30 credits for 120-credit degree)

      Major credits (12 with 6 at 3000 level)

      • CDNS2602 3.0 Citizenship and Immigration
      • CDNS2618 3.0 Visual Arts
      • HIST3646 3.0 and HIST 3648 3.0 The Immigrant Experience in Canada Or CDNS3617 6.0 Multiculturalisme et ethnicité Or GWST 3514 6.0 Genre et immigration au Canada

      Gen Ed (completed)

      Bilingual (6 credits)

      Upper level electives (not now)

      Electives (12 credits)

      • ILST3250 3.0 Économie internationale et développement
      • POLS3694 3.0 Cities, Migrants and Belonging
      • GWST1502 6.0 Introduction aux Études des femmes et de genre Or SXST 1601 6.0 Introduction aux Études de la sexualité Or FRAN2335 6.0 Initiation à la méthodologie littéraire Or POLS2600 6.0 Introduction to Canadian Politics Or CDNS1900 3.0 Reconciling Literature: Understanding Texts and Contexts And SOCI2527 3.0 Sociology of Work and Gender

        Year 3 (30 credits for 120-credit degree)

        Major (12 credits, 6 at 3000 and 6 at 4000)

        • CDNS3621 3.0 Canada in Global Perspective
        • CDNS3663 3.0 Human Rights and Civil Liberties in Canada
        • SOCI4601 3.0 Indigenous Activism
          • And CDNS3100 3.0 Individual Studies (individual project or G21)
          • Or CDNS3450 3.0 Oral History Workshop
        • Or POLS4280 6.0 Canadian Foreign and Defense Policy
        • Or HIST4310 6.0 Histoire vivante: Créer l’histoire publique du Grand Toronto

        Gen Ed (completed)

        Bilingual (FSL 1000 – 6 credits)

        Upper level electives (6 credits at 3000)

        • GWST3511 3.0 Sexualité, femmes et pouvoir
        • HUMA3644 3.0 Asylum

        Electives (6 credits)

        • ILST4651 3.0 International Refugee Protection
          • Or CDNS4643 3.0 Writing Toronto
        • SOCI4604 3.0 Gender, Politics and Culture
          • Or CDNS 4410 3.0 Society, Social Justice and the Archives

        Year 4 (30 credits for 120-credit degree)

        Major (6 credits at 4000)

        • CDNS4621 6.0 Decolonizing Canada Or CDNS4100 6.0 Individual Studies (group project or G21)

        Gen Ed (completed)

        Bilingual (FSL 1000 – 6 credits)

        Upper level electives (6 credits at 4000)

        • DRST4621 6.0 Current Intercultural Performance Practices Or HIST4618 3.0 Canadian Environmental History And SOCI4642 3.0 International Perspectives on Race and Racism Or DRST 4621 3.0 Current Intercultural Performance Practices Or CDNS4641 3.0 Beyond “Two Solitudes:” The Contact Zones in Canadian Literature

          Electives (12 credits)

          • SOCI4667 6.0 International Migrations: Contemporary Issues and Debates
          • HIST4220 6.0 Canadian Labour and Immigration History

          Click on a path below and get more information on the various skills students develop in each one. Do not hesitate to contact the program if you have any questions.

          Human Rights & Social Justice

          • Human Rights & Social Justice
            • In this path, you will learn how in Canada we have engaged and are engaging with questions pertaining to human rights and social justice. By looking at how such issues are dealt with in Canada and internationally, you will develop an understanding of what we can do to advance social justice causes and uphold human rights as well as some of the limitations on the ways in which this is done. The course selection emphasizes notably questions of civil liberties, gender relations, immigration, ethnocultural diversity, labour and the environment.

          Skills& Competencies

          • Communication: Besides the development of conventional writing and verbal communication skills, you will develop the capacity to influence and persuade others in advancing human rights and social justice causes. You will also learn to listen actively and to exercise tact and diplomacy. Negotiation skills with also be gained, starting from understanding a cause to arguing for a specific result based on facts, laws, policies and procedures
          • Interpersonal connections: You will acquire the ability to work in teams, to liaise and to network among various groups, as well as to mediate conflict on topics relating to human rights and social justice. You will also learn how to advocate for specific causes and promote inclusiveness in the projects and partnerships in which you will be involved
          • Personal success: You will gain knowledge specific to the various laws, policies and procedures pertaining to human rights, while also learning how to take initiative on causes that you love. By developing strong organizing skills, you will also acquire a strong work ethic that will reflect the ethical conduct you wish to uphold in supporting various social justice causes, while also becoming aware of the importance to be receptive to feedback, resilient and flexible
          • Social responsibility & community engagement: The knowledge you will acquire about human rights and social justice will show you how to embrace diversity and to challenge injustices. You will find out how to use one’s social consciousness to commit to and engage in advocacy work
          • Knowledge acquisition & application: The skills you will acquire include interpreting procedures and policies as they pertain to human rights as well as the ability to process and analyse various types of information and document to advance a social justice causes, notably through online tools, databases, and repositories
          • Critical thinking & problem-solving: You will be taught how to make effective decisions on complex human rights and social justice issues by developing strong planning, research, investigation and analysis skills. You will also learn how to implement some of your plans, while exercising judgement and showing creativity

          Community & Civic Engagement in Toronto

           

          • Community & Civic Engagement in Toronto
            • This path is for students interested in community work and civic engagement. Starting from the reality of living in Toronto, you will learn how to contribute, engage and organize in public life here in your community. Looking at local issues and how they fit in broader national and international trends and realities, you will discover the potential of civic engagement and how community organizing works in Toronto. From artistic forms of engagement to the inner workings of political institutions, strategies of various communities in advocating for their rights, you will learn how you can best make a difference for a cause in which you believe, while understanding well the challenges and limitations of such actions.

          Skills & Competencies

          • Communication: Besides the development of conventional writing and verbal communication skills, you will learn how to bring various perspectives together and to argue for a specific result based on facts, policies and stakeholders’ perspectives. You will develop an ability to build consensus around community and public causes, notably through active listening, exercising tact and diplomacy, and gaining negotiation skills
          • Interpersonal connections: You will be taught how to build rapport in a professional setting, create partnerships and maintain collaborations in your community. You will be able to network and liaise with various local stakeholders, mediate conflict, and advocate for specific public causes that promote diversity, inclusiveness and community empowerment
          • Personal success: You will gain knowledge and experience on how community work and civic engagement unfold in Toronto and in Ontario, notably by leading initiatives on causes for which you care. Developing relevant organizing skills, you will also develop a work ethic that will reflect your ethical commitments, and find out how to pursue your goals while incorporating the feedback of others
          • Social responsibility & community engagement: You will learn the importance of promoting diversity for strong and inclusive civic engagement and the ways in which injustices can be challenged at a community level. You will acquire the skills to make a difference in your community through advocacy, collaborations and a strong work ethic.
          • Knowledge acquisition & application: The skills you will gain include gathering and interpreting various types of documents, from community reports to official policies, as well as becoming proficient with information and communication technologies to be effective in defending public causes. You will acquire the ability to find and interpret the proper procedures for advancing specific causes as well as to adapt your argument and research to various frameworks and audiences
          • Critical thinking & problem-solving: You will gain the knowledge and experience necessary to make effective decisions for specific community and public causes by developing strong planning, research, investigation and analysis skills. You will also learn how to implement some of your plans, while exercising judgement and showing creativity

          Migration, Multiculturalism & Settlement

          • Migration, Multiculturalism & Settlement
            • In this path, we bring together questions of migration and settlement together for students interested in the ways in which Canadian society is shaped by and is shaping migration patterns. We also put an emphasis on immigration to Canada, questions of social integration and the management of local ethnocultural diversity. You will learn how these three processes have evolved together in the Canadian context, and how they link Canadian society to various places in the world. You will develop an understanding of key issues affecting Canada’s role in migratory and ethnocultural landscapes, including questions of race and racism, social issues affecting newcomers to Canada, and the ways in which Canada’s multicultural and immigration frameworks fit into global trends and realities.

          Skills & Competencies

          • Communication: Besides the development of conventional writing and verbal communication skills, you will be able to communicate effectively the complex situation of various marginalized groups to various audiences, and to argue based on facts, laws, policies and procedures. You will gain the skills necessary to build consensus around questions of migration, management of cultural diversity and social integration, notably through active listening, exercising tact and diplomacy, and negotiation skills
          • Interpersonal connections: You will acquire the ability to work in teams and to build networks and partnerships composed of various stakeholders. You will find out how to liaise with them and mediate conflict while navigating specific issues relating to migration, multiculturalism and settlement. You will also gain the skills necessary to advocate clear positions on such debates, in a way that is inclusive, collaborative and multi-dimensional
          • Personal success: You will gain knowledge specific to the various laws, policies and procedures pertaining to immigration, the management of cultural diversity and social integration in Canada. You will develop strong organizing skills and a work ethic that will help you in taking the lead in supporting specific causes and positions. You will also learn to achieve your goal, while being receptive to feedback, being flexible to changing realities on the ground and being resilient
          • Social responsibility & community engagement: You will comprehend how to promote diversity and inclusivity while addressing complex issues relating to migration, cultural diversity and social integration. You will find out how to challenge injustices in this field, using your personal ethics as a guide. You will develop the ability and the experience to advocate for a specific cause and to make a difference in improving the lives of marginalized groups such as asylum-seekers and racialized minorities
          • Knowledge acquisition & application: The skills you will gain include interpreting procedures, policies and laws in three fields (immigration, multiculturalism and settlement) and how they intersect. You will know how to process and analyse various types of information and document, notably through online tools, databases, and repositories, to advance specific positions and advocate for specific actions
          • Critical thinking & problem-solving: You will gain the knowledge and experience necessary to make effective decisions on specific migration, cultural diversity and settlement causes by developing strong planning, research, investigation and analysis skills. You will also learn how to implement some of your ideas and positions, while exercising judgement and showing creativity

          TESTIMONIES

          “The Canadian Studies program at Glendon College is unlike any other. The core courses each challenged my preconceived notions of Canada, its relationship with Indigenous peoples, and its role around the world. The flexibility of the program encouraged me to take courses in my areas of interest and beyond, which shaped my interdisciplinary approach to academia and the workplace. The professors and staff of the Canadian Studies program went far above and beyond to stimulate my intellectual curiosity and to prepare me for life after Glendon. Finally, the tight-knit, collegial relationships I forged with my fellow Canadian Studies students allowed us to tackle topics at the heart of our country and have left me with friendships I will treasure for years to come. I am honoured and grateful to have graduated from the Canadian Studies program and in the strongest possible terms, encourage future students to take part.” –Andrew Walker, Canadian Studies graduate 2018

          Laura finished her degree in Canadian Studies and English Studies in 2013. She completed a master’s degree in Canadian Studies at Trent University, with a major research paper which focuses on Canadian music.  She is now working as a music journalist.

          Laura reflects on her choice to major in Canadian Studies at Glendon »

          Our graduates work in the public and government sector, in tourism, in the not-for-profit sector, in business, in universities, and other areas. Many go on to graduate studies as well. Visit the Career Centre website for more career options in Canadian Studies. Here is a quick chart of possible careers out of the three suggested paths:

          Staff

          Coordinator
          Geoffrey Ewen
          Office: York Hall 240
          Telephone: 416-736-2100 x88466
          Email: gewen@yorku.ca

          Administrative Assistant
          L. Der Bedrossian
          Office: York Hall 160
          Telephone: 416-487-66732
          Email: canada@glendon.yorku.ca