Buddhika Bellana

Pronouns: he/il

Psychology

   YH125
   416-736-2100 x 8835
   bbellana@yorku.ca
   https://www.buddhikabellana.com/

Hello! My name is Buddhika.

I am an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at Glendon.


My interests are centered around human memory.

I will be teaching the second half of Human Neuropsychology (GL-PSYC-4530) in January 2022.

To learn more about my research, please click the tabs below or visit my website.

Episodic memory

Spontaneous thought

Narratives

Functional magnetic resonance imaging

Naturalistic experimental design

Text-analysis

Postdoctoral fellowship at Johns Hopkins University, USA

PhD in Psychology from the University of Toronto, CAN

BA in Psychology from York University, Glendon Campus, CAN

I'm interested in the idea that our memory system may be better suited to parse certain kinds of information as opposed to others.

Why is it that, in some cases, we have to exert ourselves to commit information to memory (e.g., while studying a textbook chapter), while in others, lasting memories materialize almost effortlessly (e.g., while reading a novel)? 

Using a variety of tools (e.g., naturalistic and traditional experimental design; natural language processing and machine learning; and human neuroimaging), my research aims to learn about the architecture of our memory system by determining the factors that predict whether or not a given experience will result in a lasting impression/memory.


Journal Articles

For an up-to-date list of publications, please visit my Google Scholar profile. 

Selected publications

Bellana, B., Mahabal, A., Honey, C. J. (2021). Narrative thinking lingers in spontaneous thought. PsyArXiv (preprint). https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/gxzyj. [link]

Bellana, B., Mansour, R., Ladyka-Wojic, N., Grady, C.L. & Moscovitch, M. (2021). The influence of prior knowledge on the formation of detailed and durable memories. Journal of Memory and Language. 121, 104264. [link]

Lee, H., Bellana, B., & Chen, J. (2020). What can narratives tell us about the neural bases of human memory? Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences. 32, 111-119. [link]

Ramanan, S. & Bellana, B. (2019, commentary). A domain general role for the angular gyrus in retrieving internal representations of the external world. The Journal of Neuroscience, 39(16), 2978-2980. [link]

Brunec, I.K.*, Bellana, B.*, Ozubko, J.D., Man, V., Robin, J., Liu, Z-X., Grady, C.L., Rosenbaum, R.S., Winocur, G., Barense, M.D. & Moscovitch, M. (2018). Multiple scales of representation along the hippocampal anteroposterior axis in humans. Current Biology, 28(13), 2129-2135.e6  *Equal contributions [link]

Bellana, B.*, Liu, Z-X.*, Diamond, N., Grady, C.L. & Moscovitch, M. (2017). Similarities and differences in the default mode network across rest, retrieval and future imagining. Human Brain Mapping, 38(3): 1155-1171. *Equal contributions [link]



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