At Glendon, we believe that research is a pivotal factor in a student’s undergraduate experience. As such, student engagement in research and innovation is fostered through involvement, participation, and experiential learning.   

The G21 course allows students to pursue their own passion project under the supervision of a faculty mentor in a directed course setting. While research for the course can be diverse and encapsulate various subjects, all G21 projects must align with one or more of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). By participating in the G21, students will receive 3 credits, supervision from a faculty member, education about the SDGs, have access to an allocation of $300 to fund their research project, and experiential education. 

Spaces in the course are limited.

Click on the button below to apply 

What are the benefits of being selected as a G21 Student?

  • Earning course credit 

G21 Students will receive 3 credits for their successful participation, thus supporting them in achieving their undergraduate degree in a stimulating and encouraging environment.  As such, participants can study a topic that they are genuinely interested in, gain a passion for research, and advance their degree. 

    • Gaining hands-on learning 

    Through the G21, students are given the opportunity to engage in a hands-on, experiential learning environment. This can facilitate heightened motivation, self-confidence, critical thinking, a comprehensive understanding about a student’s research topic, and the ability to engage in professional environments with faculty and peers. 

    • Accessing Unique Workshops & Events 

    G21 Students are given the opportunity to partake in workshops, events, and guest speaker series related to the United Nations SDGs, ultimately developing a comprehensive understanding about important and pressing global issues.  

    • Receiving Research Funding  

    Each G21 Student will have access to an allocation of $300 to assist them in developing their research project.  Funding has previously been used by students for inducements for survey participants and focus groups, the purchase of paid applications like Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, the purchase of podcast equipment, and even for printing professional posters.  

    • Presenting at Glendon’s Annual Research Festival  

    G21 Students are invited to present their findings at the Annual Research Festival and receive a certificate of completion for their successful participation. Here, they can engage in a panel discussion about their research with other professionals and can begin building a research portfolio.  Click here to view previous G21 projects that have been presented at the Research Festival 

    • Developing a strong foundation for graduate school applications  

    Many G21 Students choose to attend graduate or professional school.  Through the G21, a strong foundation for graduate school applications can be facilitated; students can obtain references for graduate school from their faculty supervisors, develop strong research skills which are valued by graduate institutions, and showcase their passion for academia through their participation.   

    • Gaining transferable skills for academic success, or for a resume/CV  

    G21 Students obtain a variety of skills that can be transferred to the academic environment, such as learning how to conduct library-based research, condense information, identify reputable sources for information, and analyze texts.  This opportunity to engage in experiential, hands-on learning often assists students in excelling throughout their undergraduate studies.   

    Developing research expertise can also produce transferable skills that are highly valued by prospective employers.  Many students gain communication, organization, problem-solving, and time management skills within the G21, and, depending on their research project, some even gain a comprehensive understanding of applications like Microsoft software, Zotero, and online research databases.  

     

    Eligibility Criteria

    Glendon students in their upper years of undergraduate study (third year and above) are eligible to apply.  For acceptance into the course, students must have a well-founded proposal, a faculty supervisor who has agreed to oversee their passion project, and approval from the head of Multidisciplinary Studies (MDS).

    Application Process

    1. Before submitting an application to the Research Office, prospective applicants must think of a passion project which they believe aligns with the UN SDGs and can be completed throughout the course of the 2022-23 academic year.   
    2. Students must find a Glendon faculty member who is willing to supervise their project.  
      • Click here to read tips on requesting the supervision of a faculty member  
      • If students are experiencing difficulties in finding a supervisor, they are encouraged to reach out to the Glendon Research and Innovation Office for assistance at research@glendon.yorku.ca.   

      3. Complete and submit the G21 application form 

        • Clarify your personal details (your name, email, student number, major, year of study) 
        • Indicate who your proposed supervisor will be 
        • Provide a short description (approximately 250 words) of the project you would like to pursue in the G21 
        • Explain the methods you will take to complete your research project 
        • Describe the output that your final project will take (i.e., an essay, an online art exhibit, a performance, a presentation, a podcast) 
        • Illustrate how your participation in the G21 will be helpful to you, and what you would like to learn through this experience 
        • Describe any previous research experience, your hobbies, interests, and extra-curricular activities 

        Course Timeline

        Applications will be available in the beginning of June, and students can officially enroll in the course based on their enrolment date. The G21 course will officially begin in September and will continue until April 2023.  

        Student Testimonials

        “I truly appreciated having the support and guidance from my mentoring professor. Conducting a research study as an undergraduate student is quite challenging, but through the constant support I was given, the process became less overwhelming. It was also an enriching experience being able to conduct a study that was directly related to my career field. Having the opportunity to work on something that I am passionate about has been such a highlight and although I have yet to complete my study, I am hopeful that the results of this study may potentially help future students.”

        Isabel Simpliciano, 4th-year student, French Studies and Psychology, G21, 2021-2022

        “The ability to conduct my own passion project under the supervision of a professor has definitely enhanced my undergraduate experience at Glendon. I really enjoy that I was able to build connections with Professors and was not only able to develop my understanding of a particular scholarly subject, but I was also able to receive valuable mentorship. As students, we often think of research as daunting and complex, but through this opportunity, I’ve realized how researching topics which interest me can be such a fun and rewarding experience. I’ve become more knowledgeable about my research field, and these skills have definitely transferred into my other courses.”

        Anmol Kaur, 4th-year student, International Studies, G21, 2021-2022

        Frequently Asked Questions about the G21 Course 

        Frequently Asked Questions about the G21 Course 

        What is the G21 course?   

        • Students in the G21 course have a unique opportunity to pursue independent research on a topic of their choice under the supervision of a faculty mentor.  
        • The independent research projects are referred to as “passion projects” because students should be passionate about their chosen topic of study.  
        • Each of the selected research projects must align with one or more of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. 
        • Students participating in the G21 course will be enrolled in a 3.00 credit course over the entire academic year, meeting bi-weekly. Students will receive course credit towards their university degree for work on their “passion projects”.  

         Who is eligible to apply for the G21 course?  

        • Must be enrolled at York University as a Glendon student.  
        • Students must be in their upper years of undergraduate study (3rd year and above).  
        • Students must apply to the G21 course by completing the online application form. Students’ applications must be approved before they will receive permission to enrol in the course.  
        • To apply for the G21 course, students must propose an independent “passion project” that they want to work on. Students must also suggest a faculty member who they would like to supervise their “passion project”, and who is willing to take on this responsibility.  

        What is an independent “passion project”?  

        • A “passion project” is an independent project through which you can explore a research topic of interest to you. Your chosen research topic may be an area of interest outside of your degree requirements. It is your project, designed by you. You will develop your own research questions, explore possible answers, and create project outputs that align with your topic, all within the parameters of a credited course.  
        • A “passion project” can be inspired by anything that has piqued a student’s interest, perhaps a topic that the student initially discovered in the context of an academic course and which the student wants to continue pursuing through an independent project. 
        • Examples of past “passion projects” concern topics as varied as Islamophobia in Québec law and French society, children’s experiences under French colonialism in Indochina, discrimination based on skin colour in Tamil culture, visual aids for second language learning, the importance of encouraging language learning in children with Down’s syndrome and dyslexia, innovative speech patterns in online conversations, discrimination against “accented” English, and public art as a way of learning about and stimulating conversations about sustainable development.  Click here to view past examples of G21 projects at the 2022 student research showcase. 

        Will I receive course credit for my independent “passion project”? 

        • Students admitted into the course will receive 3 credits on successful completion of the course. 
        • While the G21 is a 3-credit course, applicants must keep in mind that the course will take place over the entire academic year, during both the Fall and Winter terms. The class will meet on a bi-weekly basis. This year’s G21 course is scheduled to take place every two weeks on Monday afternoon at 3-6 pm.  
        • If a student wishes to take the course for credit in their own major or minor program to fulfil requirements, they must receive approval from their home program or department.  
        • Alternatively, students may take the course for elective (SOSC) credits with the approval of the head of Multidisciplinary Studies (MDS).  
        • Some programs may choose to recognize this course on an ad-hoc basis as counting towards degree requirements. Department heads will inform Academic Services accordingly. 

        What will I learn in the G21 course?  

        • The G21 course provides the framework for students to conduct research on a “passion project” of their choosing, in consultation with a course director and faculty mentor. The projects will apply theory to address a real-world problem using the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs).  
        • Although students will design their own “passion project”, successful completion of the course will indicate that the students have demonstrated competence in the following learning outcomes: advanced written and oral skills, critical thinking, and information literacy; global engagement, knowledge of social justice and/or environmental sustainability; and self-regulation, and intercultural awareness. 
        • Students will present their work in a manner suited to their disciplinary focus (e.g. written research paper, poster presentation, podcast, video, and so on), and they will present it at a culminating event at the end of the academic year.   

        What types of students should apply for the G21 course?  

        • This course is designed for students who are self-directed and intellectually ambitious. This course may be particularly attractive to students who are keen to pursue their studies to the graduate level, but this is not a requirement for students applying to participate in this course.  

        When will I be accepted into the course?  

        • Applications for the G21 course will open between the end of May and beginning of June, and will be accepted on a rolling basis. 
        • Course enrolment starts in mid-June.  
        • Students can expect to be accepted into G21 course by mid-August.  
        • To consult important dates university, such as when to enrol and drop university courses, visit the link here 

        How do I enrol in the G21 course? What are the steps I need to take so that I receive course credit for my G21 “passion project”? 

        • Before submitting an application to the Research Office, prospective applicants must think of a passion project which they believe aligns with the UN SDGs and can be completed throughout the course of the 2022-23 academic year.   
        • Students must find a Glendon faculty member who is willing to supervise their project.  
        • Click here to read tips on requesting the supervision of a faculty member  
        • If students are experiencing difficulties in finding a supervisor, they are encouraged to reach out to the Glendon Research and Innovation Office for assistance at research@glendon.yorku.ca 
        • Complete and submit the G21 application form 
        • Clarify your personal details (your name, email, student number, major, year of study) 
        • Explicate who your proposed supervisor will be 
        • Provide a short description (approximately 250 words) of the project you would like to pursue in the G21 
        • Explain the methods you will take to complete your research project 
        • Describe the output that your final project will take (i.e., an essay, an online art exhibit, a performance, a presentation, a podcast) 
        • Illustrate how your participation in the G21 will be helpful to you, and what you would like to learn through this experience 
        • Describe any previous research experience, your hobbies, interests, and extra-curricular activities 

        How do I liaise with my academic department so that I receive the course credit I need? 

        • If students have concerns about obtaining course credits from the G21 course in accordance with their program requirements, they are encouraged to reach out to the Research & Innovation Office for assistance at research@glendon.yorku.ca. 

        How do I find a professor to supervise my research project? What is the best way to contact them? Is it mandatory for me to have a research supervisor?  

        • Yes, you must find a professor to supervise your independent research project in the G21 courses.  
        • Consider asking a faculty member for supervision if you already have a relationship with them, possibly someone with whom you’ve taken a course, and if their research interests and areas of expertise align with your proposed research project.  
        • To view a list of Glendon faculty members with their research interests and expertise, as well as their contact information, click here 
        • If you are struggling to find a professor to supervise your project, please contact the Glendon Research and Innovation Office for help: research@glendon.yorku.ca.  

        Can students in G21 courses have their research supervised by a contract (non-tenure track) faculty member? 

        Yes, students in G21 courses can have their research supervised by a contract faculty member, if they are willing to take on this responsibility.   What should I include in an outreach email to a prospective faculty mentor? (Info borrowed from York University Career Centre resources)  

        Give some context for who you are regarding why you are writing. 

        • Explain your student status, year, program and how you obtained the Professor’s name or where you met them. 
        • What are some of your interests, skills, experiences, or goals as they relate to your interest in the G21 course and your field of academic research/study?  

        What Have I Done / What Can I Do? 

        • What notable or relevant accomplishments, skills, assets, experience, or educational achievements do you have? 

        What Do I Want? 

        • Explain your passion project idea for the G21 course and ask if the Professor would be willing to supervise you throughout the academic year. 

        What are United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs)?  

        • “The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), also known as the Global Goals, were adopted by the United Nations in 2015 as a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure that by 2030 all people enjoy peace and prosperity. The 17 SDGs are integrated—they recognize that action in one area will affect outcomes in others, and that development must balance social, economic and environmental sustainability.” Click here to view all 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs).  

        How will I help fund my research project? 

        • In 2022-23, students who participate in the G21 course will each have access to allocated funds of $300 to help with their research project.  
        • Examples of past use of funds include covering fees for professional poster printing, inducements for survey participants and focus groups, purchase of Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, or purchase of podcasting equipment.    
        • Students are encouraged to imagine creative uses of their allocated funds to help support the development and execution of their research projects.  

        Will I get paid for my participation in the G21 course?  

        • No, students will receive 3.0 course credit towards their university degree. Students will pay regular tuition fees for the course, but they will have access to funds to cover some research expenses.  Click here to learn more about course and program fees at York University.  

        Does my research project need to be conducted bilingually?  

        • No, the research that you conduct in the G21 course does not need to be bilingual. You are encouraged to pursue your research in the language of your choice, but the G21 is also a great opportunity to improve your language skills, so do not feel discouraged to work on a project in your non-dominant language. 
        • However, the G21 course will be taught in both languages. Student will attend some classes in their non dominant language but can choose to participate in the language of their choice, submitting assignments in their preferred language.  

        Which research skills and experiences do students need to be successful in the G21?  

        • Students that apply to G21 course should feel comfortable conducting independent research with some guidance from their research mentor. If you are entering third-year or higher, you will already have developed basic research skills through your previous course work. For instance, general knowledge of how to use the York University library system is a great start. Students participating in the G21 will follow a program structure throughout the year, will engage in check-ins around major research milestones and will have the support of their course director, their research mentor, and the Research and Innovation Office. We understand that pursuing an independent passion project might seem daunting at first glance, but we encourage students to explore beyond their comfort zones. The G21 is all about learning to do independent research and we want you to succeed! 

        G21 Student presentation - Research Festival 2022

        Lavaniya Thanagnjayan

        Communications program- 1styear

         Research Apprenticeship Program / G21

        Supervisor: Philippe Theophanidis

        Colorism in Tamil Media

        This project is about colorism in Tamil media, specifically when it comes to women. As a result of the British colonisation of India, they have an unfair bias towards fair skin. This resulted in almost all of the actresses in Tamil cinema to be fair skinned. They even cast white women like Amy Jackson to play the role of Tamil women. This has a severe impact on the lives and confidence of Indian women. The project takes a look at what the media is currently like, the history behind colorism, and how it affects people today.

        Biography |Biographie

        Lavaniya is a first year in the communications program and she is also the first year representative of the GCSU. She has been a part of the Research Apprenticeship program this year with Professor Philippe Theophanidis.  She like researching social topics that I feel passionately about, such as colorism, and how media (including social media) favour some people over others. Her favourite course is Introduction to communications with Professor Evan Light.

         

        Anson Cutler

        B.A. Psychology- 4th year

        GL/PSYC 4000 Honours Thesis 

        Course Director Dr. Andrée-Ann Cyr

        Biography |Biographie

        I am in my final year of study in the Psychology program at Glendon, with particular interest in cognitive developmental and perceptual psychology research.

        Examining the Role of Memory Colour in Visual Attention

        In this perceptual psychology lab experiment, I attempt to provide evidence for a sparsely-researched phenomenon known as the memory colour effect using a novel approach that addresses gaps in prior research. The novel approach is to examine how the memory colour effect interacts with the automatic cognitive process of visual attention. Participants completed a series of “spot the difference” visual attention tasks, with some tasks invoking the memory colour effect and other tasks as controls. I compare speed and accuracy on memory colour vs. control trials to assess the impact of memory colour on visual attention.

        Claire Koch

        French studies- 4th year

        Research Apprenticeship Program / G21

        Supervisor: Marc Audette 

        The Role of Public Art in Sustainable Cities and Communities

        My research project focuses on the United Nations’ sustainability goal number 11, “Sustainable Cities and Communities”. This project examines how sustainably created and minded art, especially public art, can benefit communities on multiple levels of sustainability. These levels are environmental, social and cultural. Sustainability is a complex goal which does not involve purely environmental concerns, but also must consider the ability for present and future communities to thrive and grow at the same time. Complex problems require creative solutions, and the strong potential for impact that public art possesses should not be forgotten as part of this solution.

        Biography |Biographie

        Claire Koch is a 4th year of the French studies program, set to start her Bachelor of Education in the fall. This is also her 4th year in the research apprenticeship program. In the past she has done research projects within my area of study, however this year she wanted to step out of my comfort zone and try something new. In her free time she loves spending time exploring rural and urban landscapes, as well as creating and admiring art, all of which she wanted to incorporate into this research project for RAP year 4.